Robert Hitt Neill
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Outdoor Tables and Tales
Beautiful Spiral-Bound Hard Cover
 
$20 + tax (Mississippi only) + S&H
 



When we all get to Heaven, it will be revealed unto us that men go to hunting camp to eat.  Casting a bait or calling a turkey or pulling a trigger: all these are simply Rules of the Chase.  The real reason for the Call of the Wild comes when the trophy is introduced to the fire.  Man, the ultimate predator, may nowadays grill his game over a primitive fire or microwave it in space age technological advancement – yet he no longer eats simply to sustain life; he does it because it TASTES GOOD!

The Good Lord has given mankind a bountiful buffet in the bosom of Mother Nature and modern research is now proving that wild game is more healthful than domesticated tablefare.  Having said that, it should nonetheless be clearly understood that no Outdoorsman worth his salt will admit to eating anything simply because it is good for him.  We eat game, fish, and outdoor stuff because 1) we enjoy it and 2) it is outdoors.  If it just happens to be healthy to boot, we can't be blamed for it.

In putting this cookbook together we tried for great recipes for Southern game and fish, to be prepared in modern kitchens.  However, there are scattered amongst these formal dinner concoctions a few of the primitive campfire secrets of savor, tested by countless trips afield with old friends.  After all, friendships formed around the fires could hardly stand the test of time if the cooking wasn't good.

So, pull up a log, fix a toddy, see if that barbequed bass ain't the best you ever put in your mouth and lemme tell you about when me and Dude got caught in that ice storm.  It was thundering to beat the band and hail was coming down like marbles, but the bass were biting like crazy and. . . .

HOW MANY SPLOOTS TO A GULLOP?

Seems like the easiest thing in the world would be to get a bunch of Professional Outdoorsmen to send in their favorite game and fish recipes for an Outdoor Cookbook.  Being a Professional Outdoorsman myownself, I hied me off to the backyard to knock out my Famous Award-Winning Duck Shish-Ka-Bob Recipe before the rush started.  Since I had never written it down, I asked Betsy to tag along and make notes while I whipped up the sauce, which is the key to the whole thing.

            "Okay, about six sploots of Worchestershire. . . ."

            "What's a sploot?" she interrupted.

            "A pretty hard shake," I defined.  "Now, you. . . ."

            "So, how many tablespoons or teaspoons are in a sploot?  And exactly how many sploots?  You have to be specific when you write a recipe!"

            Point is, most men cook "by the seat of their britches" as the saying goes, and test by taste.  To put this book together required more patience in more states than anything since the Confederate Constitution, and our womenfolks are to be commended for getting these measurements on paper.

            One family cook was approached to reveal the secret to her molasses cookies, and that included three "gullops" of molasses.  When queried as to the exact amount of a gullop, her answer was, "You just throws the jug over your arm and pour: when it says 'gullop. gullop, gullop,' then you cuts it off."

            So, dear cooks, while these recipes are tried and true, tested and fine-tuned for years around campfires and hunters' kitchens, many had never been scientifically measured before.  Add a whiff of woodsmoke, a sploot of this, a gullop of that, and make these recipes into your own favorites, as you enter into the spirit of these outdoor concoctions!

            After all, God blessed that first recorded barbeque in Genesis, didn't He?